Things to Know When Traveling Internationally with a Dog.

Things to Know When Traveling Internationally with a Dog.

When traveling with your dog to foreign countries, vaccinations are usually required. The specific vaccinations and medical certificates needed vary depending on the country of origin and the destination. Here are some examples of countries and their requirements:

1 European Union (EU) countries: Dogs traveling to EU countries must have a microchip, a rabies vaccination that is at least 21 days old but not more than 1 year old, and a valid pet passport or official veterinary certificate. Some countries may also require additional vaccinations or blood tests.

2 United States: Dogs traveling to the United States from other countries must have a valid rabies vaccination certificate, a health certificate issued by a licensed veterinarian, and may require additional vaccinations depending on the state they are traveling to.

3 Canada: Dogs traveling to Canada from other countries must have a valid rabies vaccination certificate and a health certificate issued by a licensed veterinarian.

4 Japan: Dogs traveling to Japan must have a microchip, a rabies vaccination that is at least 91 days old but not more than 12 months old, and a blood test for rabies antibodies. Additional vaccinations and medical certificates may also be required.

5 Australia: Dogs traveling to Australia must meet strict import requirements, which may include quarantine periods, blood tests, and additional vaccinations. Requirements vary depending on the country of origin.

It's important to note that these requirements can change frequently, so it's important to check with the destination country's embassy or consulate as well as with your veterinarian well in advance of your trip. Your veterinarian can provide you with the appropriate vaccinations and medical certificates, and can also advise you on any additional steps you need to take to ensure your dog's health and safety while traveling.


Additional resources can be found through the government agencies responsible for animal import and export regulations in the destination country, such as the Department of Agriculture, or through the International Air Transport Association's guidelines for traveling with pets. Your veterinarian can also provide additional resources and information.